Architects, Guatemala Artisans Collaborate on “Scarfitecture” Series of Handwoven Scarves

by , 12/13/11   filed under: Featured, Features

Scarfitecture, DIGS, Guatemala, eco-friendly scarves, sustainable scarves, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, green architects, architecture, social design, Ecolibri

DISTANT SHORES

After recruiting Winka Dubbeldam, Galia Solomonoff, Anna Dyson, Chris Sharples, Dukho Yeon, Ali Soltani, and Juan Carlos Matiz, Alexander and Zakova asked each architect to submit a photo or painting that could be rendered into a woven textile.

The weavers had to adapt their approaches, sometimes inventing new techniques.

The 10-week project wasn’t without its challenges. Most of the designers, for instance, had never attempted their own textile pattern before. The weavers also had to adapt their approaches, sometimes inventing new techniques to accomplish the ideas they had in mind. The team members used Skype and email to review ideas, photos, and the progress of each design, although some of the architects also seized the opportunity to pay a visit in person.

Scarfitecture, DIGS, Guatemala, eco-friendly scarves, sustainable scarves, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, green architects, architecture, social design, Ecolibri

BETTER TOGETHER

Each piece boasts its own inspiration and technique that distinguishes it structurally and contextually from the others. Dubbeldam of Archi-Tectonics created a design inspired by water and fishing, both of which are an integral part of life in the Lake Atitlan region, while Soltani of NYC firm Soltani + LeClerq took his cues from the shape of the land and Guatemala’s diversity and tolerance.

Each piece boasts its own inspiration and technique that distinguishes it structurally and contextually from the others.

For Dyson, photovoltaic panels served as the driving force behind her design. Working with her weaver, Dyson made a nanoscale image of gallium arsenide—a component in high-tech solar cells— appear like blue blades of grass. “The reproducing pattern is compelling for me as the most artificial materials at their core contain the same elements as ‘natural’ materials, except they are just sequenced differently,” she tells Ecouterre.

Proceeds from the scarves will be reinvested in Ecolibri, which aims to improve the health, education, environment, economy, and independence of families in the Lake Atitlan region of Guatemala through the creation of a sustainable marketplace. Scarfitecture is an example of one such project, one that harnesses international efforts to create a sustainable business model that can be easily replicated.

+ Scarfitecture

+ Ecolibri

+ DIGS

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