“Concealed Carry” Clothing for Fashion-Forward Gun Owners Now a Thing

by , 04/27/12   filed under: Eco-Fashion News, Featured

Woolrich, concealed carry, guns, weapons, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, transformer clothing, transformer fashion, multifunctional clothing, multifunctional fashion

Photo by Shutterstock

Weapon-concealing garments for the fashion-conscious gun owner are having a “moment,” according to the New York Times, which reports an uptick in apparel companies catering to people with permits to carry concealed weapons. Among their growing ranks is Woolrich, whose new “Concealed Carry” collection offers cotton-twill khakis and basket-weave button-downs with hidden welt pockets, false buttons, and stretchable waistbands for securing handguns, knives, or ammo. One jacket even features a channel through the back for storing plastic handcuffs.

So tell us, is "concealed carry" clothing haute or not?

  • 37 Votes HELL NO! As if I needed more reasons to be paranoid on the streets.
  • 392 Votes HELL YES! I want to protect myself and have the element of surprise on my side.

View Results

Woolrich, concealed carry, guns, weapons, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, transformer clothing, transformer fashion, multifunctional clothing, multifunctional fashion

STEALTH CLOTHING

The rise in “covert fashion” didn’t just appear out of left field. The number of concealed-weapon permits rose from five million in 2008 to seven million just last year because of changes to state laws, notes the Gray Lady. After intense lobbying from gun-rights advocates, 37 states now have “shall issue” statues that require the provision of concealed-carry permits if an applicant has no previous criminal history. Several states allow concealed weapons without any kind of permit. In contrast, only eight states were bound by such statutes in 1984, while 15 didn’t allow handgun-carrying at all.

The number of concealed-weapon permits rose from five million in 2008 to seven million last year.

The newspaper spoke to Shawn Thompson, a 35-year-old auto-dealer and gun enthusiast who calls the new threads a “step up” from military and hunting garb. “Most of the clothes I used in the past to hide my sidearm looked pretty sloppy and had my girlfriend complaining about my looks,” he said. “I’m not James Bond or nothing, but these look pretty nice.”

Other businesses honing in on people like Thompson include 5.11 Tactical, which is launching a water-resistant vest with a pistol-stowing “hand-warmer” pocket, and Under Armour, which will be adding a jacket and a plaid shirt with Velcro flaps for easy access and moisture-wicking fabrics to prevent guns from rusting.

But although gun owners say they want “maximum uncertainty” on the part of any would-be assailant, weapons experts have found inconclusive evidence that such tactics actually reduce crime. Not that it’s stopping businesses like Woolrich from cashing in on the zeitgeist, however. Allen Forkner, a spokesman for the company, explained it thus: “When someone walks down the street in a button-down and khakis, the bad guy gets a glimmer of fear, wondering: are they packing or not?”

If current projections offer any indication, then odds are that yes, yes they are.

[Via the New York Times]

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2 Responses to ““Concealed Carry” Clothing for Fashion-Forward Gun Owners Now a Thing”

  1. rkarina says:

    Two words: undercover cops

    Seriously, concealed carry is a hotly debated item. But using a standard Shutterstock photo that does not include the clothing mentioned, and looks like a dramatic scene from a bad action flick is bordering on irresponsible. It’s designed to promote a knee-jerk reaction.

    I’m not a rabid-right-wing gun but, but I do believe in a certain level of gun rights. I think we need to see responsible reporting on both sides of the issue.

    The fact is – there are states where concealed carry is perfectly legal (with a license). And there are professions where it would be nice to be carrying concealed without advertising the fact via your clothing.

    Woolrich has a history of making clothing for law enforcement.

    So, what’s the problem? Are we seriously afraid that some criminal element is going to invest their hard-stolen cash in some L.L. Bean looking couture and run rampant among unsuspecting citizens?

  2. amorsy says:

    Fashion and guns!! awww ya

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