Give the Gift of Green With a Terrarium Necklace (DIY Tutorial)

by , 11/22/11   filed under: DIY Eco-Fashion, Eco-Friendly Jewelry

DIY fashion, DIY gifts, DIY terrariums, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, living jewelry, living fashion, DIY tutorials, eco-friendly jewelry, sustainable jewelry, eco-friendly necklaces, sustainable necklaces

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES

DIY fashion, DIY gifts, DIY terrariums, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, living jewelry, living fashion, DIY tutorials, eco-friendly jewelry, sustainable jewelry, eco-friendly necklaces, sustainable necklaces

STEP ONE

Pop the cork top of your glass bottle and place a small amount of dirt inside. You should have enough to surround the roots of your plant but not so much that it won’t have room to breathe.

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STEP TWO

Carefully insert your seedling into the bottle, with tweezers if necessary. To remove dirt smears, use a chopstick or toothpick wrapped with some tissue paper.

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STEP THREE

Replace the stopper and attach a jump ring to the eye loop on top.

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STEP FOUR

Thread your bottle charm onto your chain.

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STEP FIVE

Sprinkle your plant with a little water once a week to keep your plant green and healthy.

Editor’s note: For more of Yuka’s DIY fashion tips and tricks, visit her website at Clossette.com.

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11 Responses to “Give the Gift of Green With a Terrarium Necklace (DIY Tutorial)”

  1. Wynter says:

    what happens once the plant out grows the necklace?

  2. Mecharoni says:

    can use cotton buds to clean the dirt

  3. whiskeypony (@1toughcupcake) says:

    you’re setting that plant up for slow and inevitable self-inflicted death by suffocation.

  4. hoobs55 says:

    @whiskeypony not really because contrary to popular belief plants don’t only produce oxygen. Plants undergo photosynthesis, which uses carbon dioxide or CO2 and produces oxygen as a byproduct, when there is light present as well as respiration which consumes oxygen and produces CO2 as a byproduct when light isn’t present (ie. day and night). Which is why terrariums work because it’s a recycled system. Since both are necessary processes for a plant, even if you expose the plant to a constant light source it’ll undergo both processes simultaneously. Also because you’re opening the bottle occasionally for watering the air is then again replaced.

    In other words check your facts before you bash.

  5. whiskeypony says:

    @hoobs not really because contrary to popular belief, that little plant isn’t alone in there. no matter how well your hands/soil/vial/seeds are washed, there are still millions of microbes waiting to make that vial their home, too. they’re making lots of babies in that warm, rich environment, and they’re pretty happy that the clear glass of that vial lets them sit in the soil but get some light in there too. all of them are sucking down oxygen like a sorority girl sucks down mojitos and they’re not leaving nearly as much oxygen as that little plant would like.

    true, that little plant is dwarfed by this tiny container and he’s not going to need much oxygen. but with all the carbon dioxide the microbes are producing, his metabolism is going through the roof – but with so little oxygen the light reactions just can’t keep up. an equally pressing problem is the water vapor building up in there. with such little air circulation that vapor can’t escape, and if the vapor can’t escape then the water partial pressure in that tiny air space will be too close to that in the soil. transpiration will halt and the little guy will die.

    if you open the vial daily, that plant will outgrow that little thing in a week or two. but you’re right, hoobs: terrariums can be recycled systems, but only with adequate space and air circulation OR sterile technique. this little necklace is a torture chamber. good work on that middle-school biology lesson, though. in other words, check your facts before you bash.

  6. bhs397 says:

    Hello people… plants can’t feel. Common sense.

    But very pretty, I think I’ll make one for my nature-loving friend. :)

  7. bios says:

    Biology major here. Just wanted to say, whiskeypony, I don’t think the microorganisms in there would use up that much oxygen as to kill the plant, and as for the water potential issue, my guess is that water vapor would eventually either condense and fall back to the soil, or escape when you open the bottle, so I doubt it would cause any major problems either.

  8. amber.marie says:

    @bhs397, it’s scientifically proven that plants register pain, thank you very much. I think this is a charming idea, but I’d use a wider mouthed bottle so if the plant outgrows the bottle, it’ll be easy to pull out and plant elsewhere.

  9. Ruddy says:

    I think whiskeypony needs to lay off the sauce. Number one, it’s called plant manipulation. It’s kind of like a bonsai tree. Forcing a tree that can grow 30/40 ft tall to stay only two foot tall. Number two, it’s a cork that has pores in it. Enough to allow Co2 and oxygen exchange. Atleast for that tiny little plant.

  10. Moooooorgan says:

    What kind of seedling did you use?

  11. leeanne_chapman says:

    What kind of plant is that?

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