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Gallery: 30 Eco-Fashion Predictions fo...

STARRE VARTAN (AUTHOR; PUBLISHER, ECO-CHICK)

Eco-fashion has taken on a human face after the tragic fires in Bangladesh; that story, which so closely echoed NYC's Triangle Shirtwaist fire of 1911, brought home the true costs of cheap clothes and fast fashion. Just like the women on the Lower East Side who perished in that factory fire a hundred years ago, this year's fire victims shouldn't have died, and wouldn't if cost-cutting by the fashion industry weren't so merciless (driven by consumer desire for inexpensive, throwaway clothes, and companies' need for ever-greater profits). Top executives from several companies had been working on the fire hazards so common to Bangladeshi garment factories but had stopped short of solving the problem due to costs (estimated to be about 10 cents per piece) and fears of lawsuits.

The reaction to this has story will have repercussions in 2013 in two ways: In the wider world of labor rights, people in developing nations where most of our clothes come from are, and will continue to organize for better wages and safter working conditions, despite repression. Anyone with a sense of ethics and a heart should support these much-abused workers' struggle for rights. Additionally. local manufacturing, which has been struggling in the U.S., will get a boost this year, as more companies make their clothes in the US (better for people, the planet, and the economy), or move part of their operations here. Apple is a bellwether for this movement, and many young companies, from fabricators and product designers to fashion and beauty brands will found their companies with a "made in the U.S.A." mindset from the get-go.

In terms of design and the fun side of eco fashion, we've seen an explosion of new dyeing and fabric-pattern techniques, from the renewal of age-old botanical dyes used in new ways to technology used to capture natural, handmade and antique patterns for use on clothing with modern shapes and structures. This aesthetic will only continue and proliferate; I don't see a return to minimalism in terms of fabrics anytime soon (now that pattern-mixing is widely accepted and joyfully engaged in).

We're also going to continue to see gorgeous African prints continue to mainstream, with eco fashion designers having led the charge on that trend. Lastly, I see so many interesting new materials coming out (not to mention zero-waste gaining momentum), and materials experimentation at an all-time high, which is exciting and just opens up the possibilities for reused, upcycled, recycled, and rethought materials.

ECO-FASHION ORACLES

1. Lucy Siegle (The Guardian, Green Carpet Challenge, To Die For: Is Fashion Wearing Out the World?)

2. Summer Rayne Oakes (Source4Style)

3. Sass Brown (Fashion Institute of Technology, Eco Fashion)

4. Li Yifung (Greenpeace)

5. Elizabeth Cline (Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion)

6. John Patrick (Organic)

7. Leanne Mai-Ly Hilgart (Vaute Couture)

8. Gretchen Jones

9. Tara St. James (Study NY)

10. Karen Stewart and Howard Brown (Stewart + Brown)

11. Carrie Parry

12. Meghan Sebold (Afia)

13. Timo Rissanen (Parsons The New School for Design)

14. Leah Borromeo (Dirty White Gold)

15. Owyn Ruck (Textile Arts Center)

16. Bahar Shahpar

17. Anthony Lilore (Restore Clothing, Save the Garment Center)

18. Anjelika Krishna Daftuar (A.D.O. Clothing)

19. Angelina Rennell (Lina Rennell, Beklina)

20. Abigail Doan

21. Adriana Herrara (Fashioning Change)

22. Bob Bland (Brooklyn Royalty, Manufacture NY)

23. Joshua Katcher (The Discerning Brute, Brave GentleMan)

24. Britt Howard (Portland Garment Factory)

25. Christina Dean (Redress HK)

26. Anna Griffin (Coco Eco)

27. Amy DuFault

28. Starre Vartan (Eco-Chick, The Eco Chick Guide to Life)

29. Johanna Björk (Goodlifer)

30. Emma Grady (Past Fashion Future)

One Response to “30 Eco-Fashion Predictions for 2013”

  1. Brulee says:

    I think that one of the main ethical questions should be over the lack of choice in skincare/make up brands unless one chooses to shoponline at places like Naturisimo or LoveLula where only non animal tested products are sold? In Department stores and Boots many brands especially the ‘high end’ designer ones still use the cruel and unreliable draize and force feeding methods rather than the more reliable alternatives, even ingredients linked to skin irritation and cancer are still used. This is less likely in BUAV approved non animal tested products as natural alternatives, higher quality are often preferred?

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