Eileen Fisher, Patagonia Pledge to Protect Endangered Forests

Canopy Style, Canopy, Prana, Patagonia, Eileen Fisher, Quiksilver, Lululemon, forests, rainforests, deforestation, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, eco-textiles, eco-friendly textiles, sustainable textiles, eco-friendly fabrics, sustainable fabrics, rayon, viscose, modal

Did a tree die for your yoga pants? If you’re a fan of asana-friendly cellulosics such as rayon, viscose, and modal, chances are high that someone logged an endangered forest so you could downward-dog in comfort. But some of the world’s leading apparel companies have decided to stump for the stumps. Eileen Fisher, Lululemon, Patagonia, Prana, and Quiksilver are among the brands that are partnering with forestry nonprofit Canopy to bolster protection of the world’s ancient ecosystems. Together with 14 progressive designers, including Auralis, Nicole Bridger, Prophetik, and Study NY, the companies have pledged to develop internal policies to eliminate the use of endangered-forest fibers, promote sustainable alternatives such as recycled viscose, and raise awareness of the link between fashion and deforestation.

Canopy Style, Canopy, Prana, Patagonia, Eileen Fisher, Quiksilver, Lululemon, forests, rainforests, deforestation, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, eco-textiles, eco-friendly textiles, sustainable textiles, eco-friendly fabrics, sustainable fabrics, rayon, viscose, modal

Photo by Shutterstock

SPEAK FOR THE TREES

From the lush rainforests of Indonesia to the great northern boreal forests, 70 to 100 million trees are logged annually to produce pulp for fabric, according to Canopy’s research. Placed end to end, these trees would circle the earth’s equator at least seven times. Yet these same forests help stabilize the earth’s climate by absorbing 9 billion tons of global greenhouse gases every year.

Demand for dissolving pulp is projected to increase by 122 percent in the next 40 years.

The chemical-intensive practice of turning forests into fabric needs to be curtailed before it becomes entrenched, says Nicole Rycroft, Canopy’s executive director. Demand for dissolving pulp is projected to increase by 122 percent in the next 40 years, creating a rapidly looming threat to the world’s endangered forests, as well as the communities and species that rely on them.

Still, hope remains. “Canopy is thrilled to be working with these conscientious leaders of the clothing industry,” Rycroft says. “Their actions are setting a new bar for sustainability within the sector and inspiring other large global players. That’s good news for the world’s forests, species and climate. And for those of us who love both fashion and our planet, we can finally wear our green heart on our sleeve.”

Not to mention stand in tree pose without irony.

+ Canopy Style

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2 Responses to “Eileen Fisher, Patagonia Pledge to Protect Endangered Forests”

  1. art fabrik says:

    we did use rayon for our production of wearable art. after checking on google about how rayon is made, we were shocked !!
    the deforestation of trees used to make the pulp is so scary and the most terrible processing to utilize and discharge those chemicals is devastating the natural breathing of mother earth. we are not using rayon and viscose at all any more. we are a little production team on an island in the westindies. we had a natural deforestation because of the hurricane ivan that blew away a big part of our rain forest… it was a significant change on the island’s eco system.thank you for the report on fb. we are very grateful to read that H&M and ZARA pledged using new sourcing solutions that hopefully help to stop this disaster only for some fashion trends and to support to save the world from the global warming disaster.

  2. darwin65 says:

    The best product are Modal and Tencel. Modal is produced from private beech tree forest for many years now in Europe. They refuge for deer,birds an many more wild animal. This is an ongoing success story. Tencel is also a good fiber since it is produced from Eucalyptus tree. This type of tree is grown where nothing can grow. It doesn’t need water, neither chemical to help. The root are going so deep in the soil that they are bringing up nutriment hided deep under the surface. We are not using good pieces of land, where we can grow grain, fruits or vegi. It is also better than using it for cotton crop. Even organic cotton, need good land to grow and a lot of water.

    These fiber are the ones for the next century, where food request will increase as well as water demand. Tencel use a fraction of the water needed to process cotton.

    Mario Drouin
    Darwin Global Textile Solutions
    Canand

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