Continental Clothing's "Fair Share" Line Aims to Deliver a Living Wage

by , 05/25/16   filed under: Eco-Fashion Brands, Worker Rights

Continental Clothing, Fair Share, BSD Consulting, Fair Fashion Network, living wages, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, workers rights, human rights, sweatshops, sweatshop worker, sweatshop labor, forced labor, India, U.K., United Kingdom

A living wage is a human right, and Continental Clothing, for one, wants its workers to get their deserved share. Together with BSD Consulting and Switzerland’s Fair Fashion Network, the London-based apparel manufacturer and wholesaler is launching “Fair Share,” a line of certified-organic T-shirts and hoodies with a built-in price premium. Much like a fair trade premium benefits farmers, this ring-fenced sum will go directly to garment workers in India. Mariusz Stochaj, head of product and sustainability at Continental Clothing, explained it thus: “The price premium of 10p (16 cents) per T-shirt and 54p (79 cents) per hoody is passed along the value chain, from the factory through to the retailer without being marked up, ensuring that the small additional cost at the point of sale is returned to the workers in its entirety,” he wrote in a post on LinkedIn.

Would you pay an extra 80 cents on a garment if it meant a living wage for workers?

  • 1 Votes HELL NO! Every penny counts; and besides, it's the clothing brand's responsibility, not mine.
  • 61 Votes HELL YES! It's small change for me, but a world of difference to someone else.

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Growing Warrior's Michael Lewis: We Need to Get Over Hemp's "Crunchiness"

by , 05/25/16   filed under: Eco-Textiles, Quotes

Michael Lewis, Growing Warriors, Harvesting Liberty, Patagonia, hemp, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, hemp, quotes

“Maybe we need to realize that caring about the Earth and taking care of things doesn’t necessarily mean ‘crunchy’; it’s just what we all have to do to live. That definitely is a hurdle, but we’re doing it, you know. We’re trying to make the connection that things should have value. We shouldn’t just buy cheap shit.

“When we buy cheap stuff, we’re treating everything in and around us cheaply, including ourselves. I think we should just keep moving forward. I get frustrated about that all the time because I’m doing this and I’m always called a ‘hippie.’ And I may be and I get that, but I think people need to get over that and realize that we need to take care of what we have.

[To quote American horticulturist Liberty Bailey], if we can’t treat the land that provides for us with respect, how can we expect to treat each other with respect?”

—Kentucky farmer Michael Lewis, founder of Growing Warriors and the protagonist of Harvesting Liberty, a documentary by Patagonia about the fight for industrial hemp legalization, speaking to Ecouterre about the crop’s “hippie” image as an impediment to its acceptance.

 

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Watch "Harvesting Liberty," a Short Film About America's Hemp Problem

by , 05/24/16   filed under: Eco-Fashion Brands, Eco-Textiles, Video

 

Help The Body Shop Build a Rainforest Bio-Bridge, Find "Reggie" a Mate

by , 05/24/16   filed under: Eco-Friendly Beauty

bio-bridges, The Body Shop, beauty philanthropy, eco-friendly beauty, sustainable beauty, green beauty, natural beauty, wildlife conservation, rainforests

The Body Shop wants you to help it build a bio-bridge. What’s a bio-bridge? Described simply, a bio-bridge is a green corridor that connects wildlife habitats that have been fragmented by human activity such as highways, development, or logging. Think of it as a kind of road crossing that helps estranged flora and fauna reconnect and flourish in unison. Through its new initiative, the global beauty brand aims to regenerate and protect 75 million square meters of rainforest around the world by 2020, beginning with Vietnam. Over the coming months, a single purchase at participating Body Shop stores will help fund the restoration of one square meter of rainforest.

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Solo Eyewear Makes Sunglasses From Recycled Plastic

by , 05/23/16   filed under: Eco-Fashion Brands, Eco-Friendly Eyewear

Solo Eyewear, eco-friendly sunglasses, sustainable sunglasses, eco-friendly eyewear, sustainable eyewear, recycled plastic, upcycled plastic, recycled sunglasses, upcycled sunglasses, recycled eyewear, upcycled eyewear, fashion philanthropy, Kickstarter, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style

Four years after Solo Eyewear crowdfunded a line of bamboo sunglasses with a philanthropic bent, the San Diego–based label has returned to Kickstarter to pre-launch eight new designs, this time made with 20 percent recycled plastic. Featuring names such as “Belize,” “Liberia,” and “Malawi,” the frames are named for one of the countries where Solo has helped fund free eye care for people in need through its “mission to give.” Aptly enough, the plastic remnants Solo uses come straight off the floor of an injection-molding factory that produces eyewear for several major brands.

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Google, Levi's Create "Smart" Denim Jacket for Urban Cyclists

Project Jacquard, Google, Levi's, Levi Strauss, smart fashion, wearable technology, smart fabrics, smart textiles, high-tech fashion, high-tech clothing, high-tech jackets, smart fashion, smart clothing, smart jackets, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style

There’s very little about Google and Levi Strauss’s “smart” jacket that distinguishes it from any other garment a savvy urbanite might sport. With neither flashing LEDs nor conspicuous circuits, the “Commuter” trucker doesn’t exactly telegraph “high-tech.” Yet that is precisely the point. Unveiled at Google I/O on Friday, the denim topper is the result of yearlong efforts by Project Jacquard, a collaboration between the technology giant’s Advanced Technology and Projects group and Levi’s own innovation division to create interactive textiles that fashion designers can adopt with minimal know-how. All moving parts are as close to invisible as you can get: Project Jacquard has literally woven the conductive yarns and their attendant electronics into the fabric of the jacket. In other words, Google Glass this ain’t.

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Wallis Evera's Hemp Dresses Are Ready for Their Corner-Office Closeup

by , 05/20/16   filed under: Eco-Fashion Brands, Women's Eco-Fashion

Wallis Evera, hemp, eco-friendly dresses, sustainable dresses, eco-friendly office wear, sustainable office wear, Canada, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style

Photos by Vairdy Photography

When it comes to conquering the boardroom, clothes maketh the woman. Get your #cornerofficegoals started with Wallis Evera, an online-only collection of office-ready dresses, skirts, and jackets that give polyester blends and their petroleum-derived ilk a wide berth. Ethically made in Vancouver in British Columbia, where the brand is based, each piece comprises natural fabrics such as hemp, certified-organic cotton, and wood-pulp-derived lyocell. “Hemp is a strong, incredibly versatile fiber,” Monique Parker, founder of Wallis Evera, writes on her website. “As a natural resource, it hasn’t even come close to reaching its potential in terms of market reach and application.”

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Your Next Patagonia Jacket Could Comprise Yeast-Engineered Silk

by , 05/20/16   filed under: Eco-Fashion Brands

Bolt Threads, Patagonia, synthetic silk, yeast, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, eco-fabrics, eco-friendly fabrics, sustainable fabrics, eco-textiles, eco-friendly textiles, sustainable textiles

Looks like The North Face isn’t the only outdoor-apparel brand toying with the idea of synthetic spider silk. Patagonia has just inked a deal with Bay Area startup Bolt Threads to produce the latter’s “engineered silk” protein, derived from yeast, on a commercial scale. In fact, yarn could go into production as early as this summer, according to Bolt Threads. “The $1.5 trillion textiles industry hasn’t achieved a major step forward since the 1930s, with the development of nylon,” Jim Kim, founder and managing partner of venture-capital group Formation 8, one of Bolt Threads’ leading investors, said in a statement. “Bolt Threads’ engineered and elegant silks represent an opportunity to fundamentally impact and enable properties in clothing we never dreamed would be possible.”

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Rombaut Uses Pineapple "Leather" to Make Vegan-Friendly Sneakers

Rombaut, Piñatex, pineapple leather, vegan leather, cruelty-free leather, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, vegan fashion, vegan sneakers, vegan shoes, vegan style, cruelty-free shoes, cruelty-free footwear, vegan footwear, faux leather, eco-friendly sneakers, sustainable sneakers

We’ve seen the future of leather and it doesn’t involve cows. Take Rombaut, for instance. Eschewing animal hide, the experimental Parisian label harnesses plant-based alternatives such as fig tree bark from Uganda, tapa from the South Pacific, wild Amazonian rubber, coconut fiber, and even potato starch. For fall, Rombaut is rolling out a line of unisex sneakers made with Piñatex, a robust yet pliable non-woven textile from the Philippines that is being hailed by many, including People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, as a cruelty-free alternative to leather. Engineered from the fibers of discarded pineapple leaves, Piñatex is both biodegradable and compostable. And, because it’s derived from a byproduct of fruit harvesting, it requires little in the way of additional land, water, or fertilizers.

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Studio One Eighty Nine, Yoox Team Up on Ethical Fashion Line

Studio One Eighty Nine, Yoox Team Up on Ethical Fashion Line

MADE IN GHANA Because of the handcrafted nature of the garments, no two are alike. Dawson and Erwiah said they challenged the artisans to move beyond the bounds of their experience…

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Amy Ward's Upcycled Knitwear is Big on Drama, Small on Footprint

Amy Ward's Upcycled Knitwear is Big on Drama, Small on Footprint

Ecouterre is a media sponsor of the EcoChic Design Award As one of 10 finalists for the 2015/16 EcoChic Design Award, Amy Ward knows her way around textile waste. Born and raised in…

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Agave Silk: A Cruelty-Free Vegetable Silk Made From Cactus

Agave Silk: A Cruelty-Free Vegetable Silk Made From Cactus

Photos by Maven Collection AGAVE SILK \ə-ˈgä-vē ˈsilk\ n. 1 a: A cruelty-free textile composed of filaments derived from the crushed leaves of the Saharan aloe vera cactus, part of…

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Nike Now Makes Most of Its Products From Recycled Waste

Nike Now Makes Most of Its Products From Recycled Waste

Nike is doubling down on waste. In its annual sustainability report, issued on Wednesday, the sportswear giant revealed that 71 percent of its shoes and apparel today contains recycled…

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Organic-Cotton Undies Fight Odor, Bacteria With Silver Technology

Organic-Cotton Undies Fight Odor, Bacteria With Silver Technology

Organic Basics is fighting the funk in your trunk, one pair of undies at a time. The Danish apparel company has developed a line of organic-cotton boxer briefs that keeps your nether…

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Beyoncé's "Ivy Park" Sportswear Allegedly Made in Sweatshop

Beyoncé's "Ivy Park" Sportswear Allegedly Made in Sweatshop

Bad news for the Beyhive: Britain’s The Sun reports that the Sri Lankan seamstresses who make Beyoncé’s new line of high-end athletic wear earn just £4.30 ($6.19) a day.…

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MIT's Stretchy "Second Skin" Reduces Wrinkles, Banishes Eye Bags

MIT's Stretchy "Second Skin" Reduces Wrinkles, Banishes Eye Bags

An incredible new “face lift in a tube” could dramatically reshape the appearance of eye bags and wrinkles without surgery, Gizmodo reports. Developed by scientists at the…

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Filippa K's Copenhagen Store Presents Fashion's Circular Future

Filippa K's Copenhagen Store Presents Fashion's Circular Future

FUTURE OF RETAIL Plus, spot and snap any of the retailer’s ambassadors—who will be tooling around town till Sunday in jackets emblazoned with messages such as “I’ve…

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Donald Trump is Wrong About "Made in the U.S.A." Fashion

Donald Trump is Wrong About "Made in the U.S.A." Fashion

Photo by Charles Krupa for Associated Press For all his bluster about the loss of American jobs to workers overseas, Donald Trump doesn’t appear be overly concerned about the…

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