What Daisy Did: Fashion Brand Pilots Program to Employ Homeless

 

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Freitag is a Feat of Brotherly Love That Flaunts Its European Roots

 

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Squid-Inspired Fabrics Repair Themselves, Neutralize Toxins

by , 08/17/16   filed under: Eco-Textiles, Toxic Pollution, Wearable Technology

squid, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, toxic chemicals, toxic pollution, self-healing fabrics, self-healing textiles, self-repairing fabrics, self-repairing textiles, biomimicry, eco-textiles, eco-friendly textiles, sustainable textiles, eco-fabrics, eco-friendly fabrics, sustainable fabrics, Penn State, Pennsylvania State University, Melik C. Demirel

Photo by Scubagirl85/Wikimedia Commons

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University have developed a way for fabrics to repair themselves with just a little pressure and warm water. The secret lies in a biodegradable liquid, which can be applied to conventional textiles such as cotton, wool, and polyester as a multilayered coating. Derived from a mix of bacteria and yeast, the as-yet-unnamed liquid shares similarities with a protein found in squid tentacles, specifically the rings of sharp teeth that line their suction cups. “We currently dip the whole garment to create the advanced material,” Melik C. Demirel, the professor of engineering science and mechanics in charge of the project, said in a statement. “But we could do the threads first, before manufacturing if we wanted to.”

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Vetements Designer Made Art From 17 Tons of Used Clothing

by , 08/16/16   filed under: Eco-Art, Retrend Alert

Maja Weiss, Vetements, textile waste, used clothing, recycled clothing, upcycled clothing, recycled fashion, upcycled fashion, secondhand clothing, secondhand fashion, eco-art, sustainable art, eco-friendly art, recycled art, upcycled art, Copenhagen International Fashion Fair

If you’ve ever wondered what 17 tons of used clothing looks like, Maja Weiss has got you covered. The Vetements designer recently held court at the Copenhagen International Fashion Fair, where she presented an installation inspired by the industrial decay of her native Yugoslavia after the fall of the Eastern Bloc. “Second Fashion Cycle,” as the project was named, is also an observation—and perhaps indictment—of the small consideration we give to our garments after they’re baled up and dispatched to foreign climes. “It’s kind of about diving into it in an opposite way,” Weiss told Vogue. “Everybody is looking at how clothes are made, from zero to the catwalk, and for me, this was about going in the opposite direction: looking at what happens to clothes when they’re discharged.”

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Australian Artist Creates Tidal-Wave Sculpture From Discarded Flip-Flops

by , 08/16/16   filed under: Eco-Art, Retrend Alert

David Day, Australia, eco-art, eco-friendly art, sustainable art, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, recycled art, upcycled art, recycled flip-flops, upcycled flip-flops, ocean conservation, ocean pollution

David Day, an artist from North Queensland, has transformed thousands of discarded flip-flops into a life-size tidal wave. The sculpture, which Day describes as a testament to the importance of ocean conservation, took six months to create. “I’ve caught many a wave in my day, and I’ve been smashed into the sand plenty of times too,” Day, who has been incorporating marine debris into his work for the past four years, told ABC Australia. “Ultimately, I would just like people to think about our marine creatures and the ocean, and try and make a cleaner environment for everyone to enjoy so it can keep living long after we’re gone.”

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Garment Repurposes Secondhand Clothing to Combat Overproduction

 

Fjällräven Debuts Eco-Backpacks Made From Recycled Plastic Bottles

Fjällräven, Re-Kånken, eco-friendly backpacks, sustainable backpacks, recycled backpacks, upcycled backpacks, eco-friendly bags, sustainable bags, recycled bags, upcycled bags, recycled fashion, upcycled fashion, recycled plastic bottles, upcycled plastic bottles, recycled PET, recycled polyester, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, back to school, green back to school, eco back to school

Schlep back to school, back to the cubicle, or anywhere life takes you with Fjällräven’s new line of 100 percent recycled-polyester backpacks. Available in 12 monochromatic colors, each carryall comprises materials derived from 11 post-consumer plastic bottles (nine for the mini). Fjällräven has encountered flak before for its use of perfluorooctanoic acid in its outerwear, but the “Re-Kånke” bags, while still weather-resistant, are described as mercifully PFC-free. The Swedish firm says it was able to create three types of textile—the backpacks’ main fabric, their webbing, and the lining—from a single yarn. To give them their vibrant hues, Fjällräven turned to SpinDye, a coloring process that claims to use far less water, chemicals, and energy than conventional dyeing techniques.

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Annaborgia's Vegan Wedding Dresses Are Meant to be Reworn

 

India's Children Are Dying for Your Sparkly Eye Shadow

India, blood mica, mica, child labor, human rights, workers rights, Thomson Reuters Foundation, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style

India has a “blood mica” problem. Deep within the South Asian nation’s off-the-books “ghost” mines, children as young as 5 toil alongside adults to pick and sort the mineral that gives makeup and car paint their coveted shimmer. A three-month investigation by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, however, found that children were risking more than superficial injuries or respiratory infections; they were also dying. In the major mica-producing states of Jharkhand, Bihar, Rajasthan, and Andhra Pradesh, where child labor is rampant, seven were killed in the past two months alone. Fewer than 10 percent of these deaths are reported, according to Bachpan Bachao Andolan, a child-welfare organization founded by Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, whose name means “Save the Childhood Movement” in Hindi.

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Ystr Minimizes Fashion Waste With Its "Cut to Order" Clothing

Ystr Minimizes Fashion Waste With Its "Cut to Order" Clothing

DOWN WITH EXCESS The fact that Ystr is online-only also means no retail markups, which typically factor in storefront overheads, wholesale loss, and inventory costs. Another defining…

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New York City's Jussara Lee Turns "Zero Waste" Into an Art Form

New York City's Jussara Lee Turns "Zero Waste" Into an Art Form

Life doesn’t always go the way you expected. Born to Korean parents and raised in Brazil, Jussara Lee embraced her love of tailored clothing from a young age. After a transitory…

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"Fast Fashion" Made These Men Some of the Planet's Richest

"Fast Fashion" Made These Men Some of the Planet's Richest

Want to get rich? Build a clothing empire based on aggressive expansion, breakneck turnarounds, cheap materials, and even cheaper labor. “Fast fashion,” as Quartz reported…

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Mushroom-Infused Burial Suit Helps the Body Naturally Decompose

Mushroom-Infused Burial Suit Helps the Body Naturally Decompose

For the human body, death is only the beginning. These meat sacks of ours are hothouses of chemicals, and not just the good kind. Pesticides, flame retardants, heavy metals, and other…

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After PETA Exposé, Patagonia Reboots Sustainable Wool Standard

After PETA Exposé, Patagonia Reboots Sustainable Wool Standard

Photo by Davide Ragusa/Unsplash When People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals accused one of Patagonia’s wool suppliers last August of abusing its lambs and sheep, the…

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"Remade in the U.S.A." Brings Eileen Fisher Closer to a Closed-Loop Economy

"Remade in the U.S.A." Brings Eileen Fisher Closer to a Closed-Loop Economy

REMADE FOR THE BETTER “In their year working with us as Social Innovators, Teslin, Lucy, and Carmen supplied both a galvanizing enthusiasm and attainable ideas for a new model of…

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Stabilimentum: A Couture Face Mask That Uses Spiderwebs to Filter Air

Stabilimentum: A Couture Face Mask That Uses Spiderwebs to Filter Air

How far would you go for clean air? If you’re an arachnophobe, perhaps not very. At the Biodesign Summit in New York City last month, students from the University of Pennsylvania…

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FIT Students Turn Algae, Fungi Into Biodegradable Textiles

FIT Students Turn Algae, Fungi Into Biodegradable Textiles

BIOMATERIAL But alginate is typically used in sheets, a form that doesn’t lend itself well to fashion designers. Deciding to change the form factor into something more familiar,…

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Archaeologists Just Found a 3,000-Year-Old Ball of Yarn

Archaeologists Just Found a 3,000-Year-Old Ball of Yarn

True story: Archaeologists in England just unearthed a 3,000-year-old—and extremely fragile—ball of yarn. Buried in the waterlogged depths of the Must Farm Bronze Age settlement, a…

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