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9 Sustainable Fashion Brands That Produce Ethically in Bangladesh

by , 05/08/13   filed under: Fair Trade, Features

Bangladesh, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, workers rights, human rights, fair trade, fair-trade fashion, fair-trade clothing, fair-trade accessories, People Tree, Tulsi Crafts, Trash to Trend, Kaaru, Global Girlfriend, Bhalo, Bachhara, Apolis, Azadi Project

PEOPLE TREE

People Tree has been working since 2001 to transform “Made in Bangladesh” from a mark of shame into a badge of pride. Based in the United Kingdom, the organic-cotton pioneer helped establish Swallows, a fair-trade community in Thanapara that provides superior wages and accommodation for more than 200 women. A portion of the profits from hand-weaving, dyeing, and tailoring cover the operation costs of the Swallows school, which currently serves 320 local children. In 2007, People Tree laid the groundwork for a daycare center for 60 babies and toddlers.

+ People Tree

Bangladesh, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, workers rights, human rights, fair trade, fair-trade fashion, fair-trade clothing, fair-trade accessories, People Tree, Tulsi Crafts, Trash to Trend, Kaaru, Global Girlfriend, Bhalo, Bachhara, Apolis, Azadi Project

BHALO

Bhalo, a womenswear label that hails from Perth in Australia, works with fair-trade groups like Swallows and Folk Bangladesh to marry traditional South Indian textiles with modern silhouettes. Besides courting ethical labor conditions that promote community development, Bhalo maintains a pro-environment angle, as well, favoring AZO-free hand-loomed cottons and hand-printed silks over their mechanized counterparts.

+ Bhalo

Bangladesh, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, workers rights, human rights, fair trade, fair-trade fashion, fair-trade clothing, fair-trade accessories, People Tree, Tulsi Crafts, Trash to Trend, Kaaru, Global Girlfriend, Bhalo, Bachhara, Apolis, Azadi Project

KAARU

Kaaru employs artisans in rural Bangladesh to create its handwoven, 100 percent organic-cotton clothing. (“Kaaru” is the Bengali word for “artisan”.) “I feel that it is my moral duty as a Bengali-American to help the Bengali Artisan develop their lives and their childrens’ lives through the selling of quality and stylish hand-made fair-trade products,” Nafisa Fairuz Chowdhury, the label’s founder, explains. “Why fair trade? Because it allows the artisans to be paid a fair wage for the products they produce, and in turn gives them opportunities to improve their lives.”

+ Kaaru

Bangladesh, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, workers rights, human rights, fair trade, fair-trade fashion, fair-trade clothing, fair-trade accessories, People Tree, Tulsi Crafts, Trash to Trend, Kaaru, Global Girlfriend, Bhalo, Bachhara, Apolis, Azadi Project

BACHHARA

Amanda Fisher founded Bachhara in 2010 as a way to provide for the families of the slum children she was teaching in Bangladesh. What began as an ad-hoc sewing center is now a full-fledged social enterprise run by the Jaago Foundation to promote its mission of eradicating poverty through education. Bachhara has provided 12 women, to date, with the skills they need to eke out respectable livelihoods, whether at the sewing center or through a home-based enterprise of their own.

+ Bachhara

Bangladesh, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, workers rights, human rights, fair trade, fair-trade fashion, fair-trade clothing, fair-trade accessories, People Tree, Tulsi Crafts, Trash to Trend, Kaaru, Global Girlfriend, Bhalo, Bachhara, Apolis, Azadi Project

TRASH TO TREND

Trash to Trend’s Reet Aus worked with Beximco in Dhaka to produce the world’s first mass-produced upcycled clothing collection for both men and women. “The exploitative nature of linear industrious systems cries for better solutions,” Aus says. “In the light of growing resource scarcity, upcycling has become not only interesting but important to develop improvements for the system.”

+ Trash to Trend

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