These “High Fashion” Ads Contain a Grim Message About Child Labor

by , 05/18/15   filed under: Worker Rights

Save the Children, public service announcements, PSAs, eco-fashion ads, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, child labor, sweatshops, sweatshop labor, sweatshop workers, human rights, workers rights, Lew’Lara\TBWA, Abrinq Foundation


On Facebook, the São Paulo agency says the project’s intent isn’t to criticize the fashion industry, but to “draw the attention of the people for a cause so serious as child labor.”

Coupled with the hashtag #Dress4Good, the campaign encourages members of the public to post “positive fashion-forward images” on their social media.

Child trafficking is lucrative and often associated with criminal activity and corruption, according to Save the Children.

RELATED | “Fair Trade” Clothing Labels Expose Truth About Sweatshops

The group estimates that 215 million children are employed in child labor at any one time, not just in factories, but also in situations such as domestic servitude, organized beggary, agriculture, mining, and child soldiering.

“Sometimes sold by a family member or an acquaintance, sometimes lured by false promises of education and a “better” life—the reality is that these trafficked and exploited children are held in slave-like conditions without enough food, shelter, or clothing and often severely abused and cut off from all contact with their families,” it adds.

A similar initiative led by the Canadian Fair Trade Network in March used “honest” clothing labels to lay out the hidden story about sweatshops.

+ Save the Children

[Via AdWeek]

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