Site Meter

VIDEO: Think Global, Wear Local With Fibershed’s 150-Mile Wardrobe

by , 07/07/11   filed under: Eco-Textiles, Featured, Features, Green Designers

Fibershed Project, Rebecca Burgess, locavore fashion, local fashion, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, natural dyes, California

LOCAL COLOR

A few years ago, Burgess traveled to Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia, where she witnessed firsthand the damage the garment industry caused to the people and environment. “Labor is sought for cost first and foremost, not its quality, leading to massive exploitation and many unstable jobs,” Burgess writes on her website. “We have offshored the effects of our consumption, which has led to a great disconnect of the actual environmental and social costs of our clothing.”

“We have off-shored the effects of our consumption, which has led to a great disconnect the costs of our clothing,” says Burgess.

Burgess started the Fibershed project to “swing the pendulum of our production and consumption” to a happier medium by integrating organic fibers, natural dyes, and local economies. “In my community alone, thousands upon thousands of pounds of wool are composted or thrown into the landfills each year,” says Burgess. “We have a 13 percent unemployment rate, all the while if you go to a store to buy a wool undershirt, the raw material is from New Zealand and the production from China.”

Fibershed Project, Rebecca Burgess, locavore fashion, local fashion, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, natural dyes, California

COMMUNITY BOUND

Although it started out as an experiment, Fibershed has evolved into a model for sustainable garment production. Burgess plans to drum up support for her fibershed network first by building a cotton mill on Foxfibre’s organic farm in the Capay Valley, then by buying industrialized weaving equipment and knitting frames for Bay Area designers to work with local fibers.

Although it started out as an experiment, Fibershed has evolved into a model for sustainable garment production.

With the help of with photographer Paige Green, Burgess distilled her experience into a book, Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes. Each section includes a knitting project using wools colored with seasonal plants. Her book, like the project that preceded it, extolls a “bioregional wardrobe” that not only “speaks the language of the landscape” but also provides a template for communities everywhere to adopt and adapt.

+ Fibershed

[Via The Bay Citizen]

Related Posts

Leave a Comment

Please keep your comments relevant to this blog entry. Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments.

Please note that gratuitous links to your site are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments.

Add your comments

NEW USER

Sign me up for weekly Ecouterre updates

Let's make sure you're a real person:

CURRENT USERS LOGIN

Lost your password?