Why is PETA Giving Away Fur Coats?

by , 12/19/13   filed under: Animal Cruelty, Eco-Fashion News

homelessness, animal fur, fur, animal rights, animal cruelty, animal welfare, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, Detroit, Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries, Bethlehem House

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People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has been doling out fur coats for free, but not because the infamously provocative animal-rights group has had a change of heart. As temperatures in its home base of Detroit plunged below freezing Monday, the organization partnered with Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries and Bethlehem House to distribute animal pelts—as well as leather, wool, and angora items—to the city’s homeless. Its message? Wearing animals is only excusable if no other options remain. “PETA can’t bring the animals who were slaughtered to make these coats back to life,” says Ingrid E. Newkirk, president of PETA, in a statement. “But we can send a message that only people truly struggling to survive have any excuse for wearing fur,”

homelessness, animal fur, fur, animal rights, animal cruelty, animal welfare, eco-fashion, sustainable fashion, green fashion, ethical fashion, sustainable style, PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, Detroit,  Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries, Bethlehem House

Photo by Shutterstock

WARM GIFTS

Although PETA is better known for its headline-generating antics, including flour-bombing Kim Kardashian for wearing fur and featuring scantily clad celebrities in its “I’d Rather Go Naked Than Wear Fur” campaign, it also collects dozens of coats and other animal-derived clothing every month from people who have switched to cruelty-free clothing.

For every cuff, collar, trim, or coat made from real fur, an animal was electrocuted, bludgeoned, strangled, or skinned alive.

For every cuff, collar, trim, or coat made from real fur, an animal was electrocuted, bludgeoned, strangled, or even skinned alive, says PETA spokeswoman Katie Arth. “People are horrified and no longer want to continue to wear the products,” she says.

PETA holds a few “fur kitchens” every year at homeless shelters around the country, Arth adds. Besides shipping hundreds of furs to warm refugees in Afghanistan and Iraq, the group sometimes donates coats to wildlife refuges to be used as animal bedding.

+ People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

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